Reconnecting With My Roots, A Trip To Serbia – Danube River and the Golubac Castle

By Goran Prvulovic

After visiting throughout much of rural Serbia, my son and I decided to take the scenic route back to Belgrade as we travelled alongside the famous Danube river. As we drove alongside the famous geographical landmark, which demarks the Romanian-Serbian border, we got to see some of the most beautiful scenery that the country has to offer.

An interesting fact that you might not know is that the Danube’s widest and narrowest point is both in Serbia, quite close to each other. The river flows through a narrow gorge called the Iron Gates, which stretches for around 134 km before opening up into an area so wide that it looks more like a lake than a river.


At the end of this gorge where the river opens up sits a gorgeous expanse of water, 5.5km at it’s fullest, being overlooked by the famous Golubac Fortress. It overlooks one of the most beautiful vistas in all of Eastern Serbia and a frequent site for watersport competitors to race or train for their next competition.

Travelling up from my hometown with my son, the 134 km through the valley brought us past many villages. One of the places we stopped for a scenic break was beside one of these coastal settlements on the river (see photo 1). I couldn’t help but take a picture of my son overlooking the scene. I liked how he turned out – looking at his side
with the pier on the other side of the image.

One of the most beautiful pictures of the river I managed to capture was photo 2. Both the sky as well as the river were in perfect condition to show off some of the beauty that Serbia has to offer. The only thing that, in my eyes, blemishes the picture is the wind turbine on the top of the hill, a piece of man-made machinery in an otherwise beautiful portrayal of nature’s perfection. Across the river in Romania, so if you could swim across what is the largest river in Europe, you would be in another country – literally.

Once driving through the ravine that is the narrowest part of the river, the scenery opens up to what seems like a lake, but is, in all reality, a continuation of the same river just now at it’s widest part. Breathtakingly, tourists who take this route through the valley will be greeted not only by the site of this body of water but also of this ancient medieval castle that looks over the river (photo 3).

Again, the weather was spectacular not just for sightseeing, but for photography as well.

Here is another picture of the fortress, albeit I prefer the other picture a bit more. The narrow scope of the photograph misses out on the beauty of the river, and the close-up of the hill I feel doesn’t add too much to the image (photo 4). For the most part, I prefer having my landscape subjects more to the side than in the centre of the picture, although there is always an exception to the rule…

Here’s a picture of the fortress from the other side (photo 5). Once you drive through a tunnel, onlookers will notice a tourist/cultural site where they can stop by, get food, and learn more about the castle. This is the view from within the site - you will notice that the castle was unfortunately under renovation, but it doesn’t detract too much from the shot.

This is a case where even though the subject, the castle, is in the centre; I still think it’s a pretty good picture nonetheless. There is a greater harmony between the colours in this image as opposed to the other one - not only do you see more of the beautiful river and sky, but also the nice stone sidewalk, and a pleasant looking forest off to the right-hand side. Pictures that have a more vibrant colour palette not only look better, in my opinion but also sell more as well.

That concludes my rural adventure throughout Serbia – but there is still much Urban photography I have yet to share.

Until next time,

Goran

 

 Photo 1

Photo 1

 Photo 2

Photo 2

 Photo 3

Photo 3

 Photo 4

Photo 4

 Photo 5

Photo 5